• Blister in mouth

    Blisters are the most familiar disorder of the mouth that causes discomfort and annoyance to millions of Americans. It causes small sores which develop in or around the mouth, and often are confused with each other. Blisters, also known as cold sores, usually occur outside the mouth–on the lips, chin,...

    Blister infection

    Watch for a skin infection while your blister is healing. Signs of a skin infection include increased pain, swelling, redness, or warmth, red streaks extending away from the blister, a discharge of pus or a honey-colored fluid, fever, swollen glands. A skin infection is more likely if the dirt remains in a...

    Itchy blisters

    Itching around a blister can be a sign that the blister is healing. Other possible causes of itchy blisters include a viral illness, such as chickenpox or shingles. Red bumps may turn into blisters that become cloudy, break, and scab over. Contact with something in the environment that causes a skin...

    Blister on gums

    Recurrent blister on gums afflict about 20 percent of the general population. The medical term for the sores is aphthous stomatitis. Blister gums are usually found on the movable parts of the mouth such as the tongue or the inside linings of the lips and cheeks. They begin as small oval or round reddish...

    Blister treatment

    Most blisters caused by friction or minor burns do not require a doctor’s care. New skin will form underneath the affected area and the fluid is simply absorbed. You can soothe ordinary blisters with vitamin E ointment or an aloe-based cream. Do not puncture a blister unless it is large, painful, or...

    Blister remedies

    Blisters are your body’s way of saying it’s had enough. Be it too much friction or too much ambition, a blister is much like a muscle cramp or side stitch and is designed to slow you down and make you better prepared for physical activity. In some cases, blisters result from the painful rigor of...

    Pop a blister

    Annoying and painful, blisters are caused by friction, usually your shoes or socks rubbing against your skin. Anything that intensifies rubbing can start a blister, including a faster pace, poor-fitting shoes and foot abnormalities, such as bunions, heel spurs and hammertoes. Heat and moisture intensify...

    Blisters

    A blister is an area of raised skin with a watery liquid inside. Blisters form on hands and feet from rubbing and pressure, but they form a lot more quickly than calluses. You can get blisters on your feet the same day you wear uncomfortable or poor-fitting shoes. You can get blisters on your hands if you...

    Water blister

    A blister having watery contents without any content of blood or pus is known to be a water blister. It can also be said to be a blister containing a non-purulent clear watery content. As you think about that, it’s important to remember that the chances of developing a blister increase as the forces...

    Throat blister

    A throat blister is a disease, which is primarily located in the area around the tonsils. Both a virus and bacteria can be the cause of it. A throat blister is partly a disease in itself and partly an effect of other diseases such as flu and glandular fever. The disease is normally seen in children and...

    Blister on foot

    Blisters forms when feet get hot and sweaty, making socks stick to the feet. The sock and foot then rub against each other and the inside of the shoe. Fluid fills up a space between layers of skin to protect the area, like a small balloon. That’s how a blister forms. People with diabetes may not be...

    Fever blisters

    Fever blisters are familiar skin conditions that affect 15% to 30% of the United States population. Fever blisters are generally caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV) and are the most common manifestation of a herpes simplex virus infection. Fever blisters are caused more regularly by the herpes simplex...

    Blister socks

    Moisture and friction are primary causes of blisters and foot discomfort. Wright sock’s anti-blister and moisture management systems scientifically combine today’s advance fabrics with socks uniquely designed to enhance the performance of today’s competitive athletes. Today’s...

    Burn blister

    There are three kinds or levels of burns. It may be either of the first degree or second degree or the third degree. First degree burns blister only affects the outer layers of the skin. They cause or result into pain, redness, and swelling. The second degree burns blister can also be said to be partial...

    Blister healing

    A blister is a small pocket of fluid in the upper skin layers and is one of the body’s responses to injury or pressure. The feet are particularly prone to blisters. Ill-fitting shoes or friction can damage the skin, and a blister forms to cushion the area from further damage as it heals. The body...
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